saintbobrovsky

kevin-hate:

kevin-hate:

GIVEAWAY!

As promised:

  • iPhone 5 cases: Since I don’t have an iPhone 5 anymore, I have no use for the cases I bought for it. 3 are simply plastic covers, one is an external battery/charger (it’s pretty handy actually), and one is an impact case.
  • Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point and Outliers, Green Room and Studio C journals, 5 DVDs: The Da Vinci Code, Inception, The Messenger, Saving Private Ryan, Miracle. (DVDs purchased used. obviously in good condition)
  • Shirseys (players based off of request) Claude Giroux, Ryan McDonagh, Patrice Bergeron, Patrick Kane.
  • Bath and Body Works “Hawaii” body mist, Pink Chiffon body lotion, 2 Alex and Ani bracelets, eos lip balm, gold necklace handmade in Italy.
  • USMNT scarf.

You can reblog as many times as you want and likes count.

Must be following me X.

I will be using a random number generator to pick a winner on July 1st, 2014.

I think I covered everything but feel free to ask if you have any questions!

Good Luck! :)

Only about an hour left!

cyberslutprincess
malformalady:

people visiting “The Gateway to Hell,” a huge burning gas crater in the heart of Turkmenistan’s Karakum desert. The fiery pit was the result of a simple miscalculation by Soviet scientists in 1971 after their boring equipment suddenly drilled through into an underground cavern and a deep sinkhole formed. Fearing that the crater would emit poisonous gases, the scientists took the decision to set it alight, thinking that the gas would burn out quickly and this would cause the flames to go out. But the flames have not gone out in more than 40 years.
Photo credit: Igor Sasin/AFP/Getty Images

malformalady:

people visiting “The Gateway to Hell,” a huge burning gas crater in the heart of Turkmenistan’s Karakum desert. The fiery pit was the result of a simple miscalculation by Soviet scientists in 1971 after their boring equipment suddenly drilled through into an underground cavern and a deep sinkhole formed. Fearing that the crater would emit poisonous gases, the scientists took the decision to set it alight, thinking that the gas would burn out quickly and this would cause the flames to go out. But the flames have not gone out in more than 40 years.

Photo credit: Igor Sasin/AFP/Getty Images